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Cat Tealight Candle Holder

Vintage Halloween Postcards
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   THE SHIVERS - A NEW HALLOWEEN PARTY GAME

The following article was written by a certain Kate Hudson and found in an issue of the New York Tribune newspaper circa October 26, 1919. It is about an entertaining game called The Shivers which should be enjoyed at your next Halloween party.

A New Halloween Game - The Shivers

Halloween and shudders seem to go together, then how about this game for goose-prickles? It is one Mr. Mystery Man used to play while still seated around the Halloween supper table in the proper dim, shadowy light and with all hands well underneath the overhanging witch and black cat decorated tablecloth. We christened it The Shivers.

We played it by passing carefully "prepared-to-make-one-shiver" articles from hand to hand, without seeing what they were. It is surprising how "creepy" things entirely innocent to the sight can be to the touch. Whoever squeals or drops what he gets hold of pays a fine.

The things to pass are brought on a covered tray to Mr. or Mrs. Mystery Man at the head of the table and handed from her right hand to her neighbor's left and then right and so on around the table. As it returns to the left hand of the one at the head of the table she drops it and takes up the next article.

Anything woolly, fluffy, slippery, cold or wabbly will feel "spooky" to the unseeing receiver. A limp bean bag, a fluff of cotton-wool, the feathery end of a bric-a-brac duster, a lucky rabbit's foot, a bit of fur, a string of cold glass beads, an angora mitten loosely stuffed and above all, a kid glove firmly stuffed with wet sea sand and kept on ice till needed are some things with which successfully to play "The Shivers."

Let the Mystery Man or Woman at the head of the table wear a long cloak and mask and let every one guess for a prize the names of the objects passed, each one making a written list when the last "shiver" has gone around the table.